Watch OpenAI Bots Destroy Top Human Players in Dota 2

Aug 10, 2018, 03:21
Watch OpenAI Bots Destroy Top Human Players in Dota 2

They are so well-coordinated and focused on teamwork that it was almost impossible for any of the human players to single a bot out.

In the three-game series, OpenAI Five bots won the first two games and in the final game, lost it to the human players, as the audience selected their team of five against the AI team. If the the OpenAI Five are victorious, they not only join the pantheon of machines that have publicly beaten humans at games (Deep Blue, Watson, AlphaGo), but will have done so in a game that balances several real-time interactions at once. OpenAI's five-on-five bot team has been in development all year, and last month it was beating amateur teams, according to OpenAI's developers, but this was the first bout against real pros: Former player Ben "Merlini" Wu, former player Ioannis "Fogged" Loucas, caster Austin "Capitalist" Walsh, former player William "Blitz" Lee and current pro David "MoonMeander" Tan. The AI bot has once again smashed the semi-professional Dota 2 players which are ranked in the 99.95 percentile in the world. Heroes in Dota 2 often interact in complex ways.

The bot has been developed by OpenAI which is a non-profit organisation founded by SpaceX founder Elon Musk, and Sam Altman. Next step, is The International 2018 (T18), which is Valve's own Dota 2 major and considered one of the biggest e-sports tournaments in the world. The AI team consists of five neural networks that train using 128,000 CPUs at once, playing 180 years' worth of matches against themselves every day.

After losing the first three games of Go to Google's AlphaGo, Lee Sedol, a professional player ranked second in global titles, deployed a highly unusual strategy to win the fourth game, inspired in part by the idiosyncratic algorithmic playing style of the AI that he had observed during the previous three games. The firm has also been tweaking the neural networks, altering the bot team's in-game reaction time to near human levels, and helping it learn additional strategies. However, the show's still going on Twitch with OpenAI explaining more about how they built and tested their team, and what's next for them.

"It's hard to know what kind of progress you're making if you're just making progress in simulators", Jack Clark, who works at OpenAI, said in an interview with Axios.

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