Federal Bureau of Investigation conducted over 200000 gun background checks on Black Friday

Nov 28, 2017, 00:39
Federal Bureau of Investigation conducted over 200000 gun background checks on Black Friday

The National Instant Criminal Background Check System, which allows most shoppers to buy a gun in minutes, is struggling under demand that has risen from 1 million requests for checks in 1998 to a record 27.5 million a year ago, NPR reports.

Figures show that over 200,000 people tried to buy a firearm in the United States on the day the sale hit - the first Friday after Thanksgiving. The bureau fielded 203,086 background check requests for gun purchases on the day after Thanksgiving-the highest daily total ever, reports USA Today. The number represents a significant jump from the previous single-day record of 185,713 requests for background checks.

The National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) has recently been scrutinized and put under a verbal microscope when Attorney Jeff Sessions directed the FBI and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) to do a comprehensive review of the NICS and its procedures.

"The National Instant Criminal Background Check System is critical for us to be able to keep guns out of the hands of those that are prohibited from owning them", Sessions said. Because the Federal Bureau of Investigation may turn down some buyers, these requests aren't a ideal representation of gun sales, but they are suggestive of demand. But it does suggest that firearms could have been the exception to what appeared to be generally sluggish Black Friday sales in brick-and-mortar stores. "First thing you've got to do is make sure all gun sales are covered by background checks".

A total of 26 people were killed November 5 when a gunman opened fire on people at a church in Sutherland Springs, Texas. The Air Force admitted that it failed to send crucial information to the NICS, including the gunman's prior court-martial conviction for assaulting his wife and her infant son. With President Trump in office and Republicans running Congress, the prospect of tighter federal gun control receded.

Gun demand rose as President Barack Obama called for tougher regulations after major shootings and then-Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton led in many election polls.

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